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Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution | MyProperty.ph
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Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution

by Jillian CariolaPublished: January 19, 2017Updated: January 19, 2017

Crowded and outdated they may be now, but these places deserve far more recognition for their role in shaping Philippine history.

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution EDSA Monument

 

“If these walls could talk” is a phrase made popular by the fact that in many important events in history, the locations themselves are considered mute witnesses that could, if offered a chance, give detailed accounts of these happenings. This could not be truer for the many key locations that played a big part in the events surrounding Martial Law and the subsequent EDSA People Power Revolution.

When fallen Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos declared Martial Law in 1972, several sites throughout Metro Manila saw the rise of a dictator, the silencing of free speech, the rebellion of an opposing nation, and the fall of an authoritarian regime. Here are seven noteworthy places that served as stages for some of the most momentous chapters of our country’s history.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Camp Crame
Camp Crame. Photo by Ryomaandres via Wikimedia Commons

Camp Crame
After announcing that the country has been put under Martial Law on September 21, 1972, the government began rounding up personalities that were considered threats to Marcos. First to be arrested was Senator Benigno Aquino Jr., an outspoken critic against the Marcos regime, at midnight on September 22. By 4 a.m. the next day, a quarter of the 400 targeted personalities had been arrested and had been detained in Camp Crame.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Fort Bonifacio Global City
Present-day Fort Bonifacio. Photo via Shutterstock

Fort Bonifacio
One of the biggest detention centers in the Philippines during Martial Law, Fort Bonifacio served as prison for Senator Aquino when he was arrested for accusations of murder, illegal possession of firearms, and subversion in 1972. In 1977, he was found guilty and sentenced to die by musketry, although such sentence was not carried out as the government’s record for human rights was under intense international scrutiny. After over seven years of incarceration, Aquino suffered a heart attack, after which he was allowed by First Lady Imelda Marcos to have bypass surgery in the United States, where he would go on self-imposed exile.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Ninoy Aquino International Airport NAIA
Ninoy Aquino International Airport. Photo via Shutterstock

Manila International Airport (now the Ninoy Aquino International Airport)
After a three-year exile in the United States and despite death threats from pro-Marcos groups and the military, Senator Aquino decided to come back to the Philippines with the intent of talking President Marcos into restoring democracy in the country. On August 21, 1983, upon arriving at the Manila International Airport, he was being escorted from the Taiwanese commercial flight to a vehicle that would transport him to prison when he was shot in the head and killed instantly. His assassination was the catalyst that would transform a small isolated movement against the government into a full-blown national revolution.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Ayala Avenue
Ayala Avenue. Photo via Shutterstock

Ayala Avenue
Shortly after the death of Senator Aquino, rallies and demonstrations against the Marcos administration were held all over the country, most notably in the central business district of Makati. Amidst a shower of yellow confetti (hence, the name “Confetti Revolution”), rallyists led partly by employees of major corporations in the area would converge along the avenue in protest, and these demonstrations would occur regularly until the 1986 fall of the authoritarian regime.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Ayala Avenue
Epifanio Delos Santos Avenue. Photo via Shutterstock

Epifanio De los Santos Avenue (EDSA)
On February 7, 1983, a snap election was held between Marcos and Aquino’s widow, Corazon, who was encouraged by the growing opposition to run for president. The results came in favor of Marcos, which angered the public due to reports of alleged ballot tampering and election violence. Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) President Cardinal Ricardo Vidal then took to Catholic shortwave station Radio Veritas to enlist the public’s help to provide emotional support, food, and other supplies to the rebel leaders situated along EDSA between Camps Crame and Aguinaldo. During the height of People Power, millions flocked EDSA from Cubao to Ortigas Avenue in support of a peaceful revolution.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Club Filipino
Club Filipino. Photo by Ramon FVelasquez via Wikimedia Commons

Club Filipino
The inauguration of Corazon Aquino as President of the Philippines was held on the morning of February 25, 1986, at Club Filipino’s Sampaguita Hall (renamed Kalayaan Hall). She was sworn into office by Senior Associate Justice Claudio Teehankee, while Justice Vicente Abad Santos administered the oath of Aquino’s running mate Salvador Laurel as Vice-President.

 

Seven significant locations during Martial Law and the People Power Revolution Malacanang Palace Malacañang
Malacañang Palace. Photo by the Official Gazette of the Philippines via Wikimedia Commons

Malacañang Palace
Malacañang Palace served as the home of the Marcos family during Ferdinand’s 20-year run as president, halfway through which he declared Martial Law that lasted over eight years (1972–1981). During his reign, several attempts were made by the opposing public to forcibly enter the Palace, including the Battle of Mendiola during the First Quarter Storm. It was also at Malacañang that Marcos held his own presidential inauguration (on the same day as that of President Aquino at Club Filipino) for what would have been his fourth presidential term, prior to fleeing with his family to Hawaii in the United States.

 

February 25 is the 31st anniversary of the EDSA People Power Revolution. Before writing off these spots as out-of-date or congested, it might be worth your time and effort to read up on the country’s history to see them in a different light.

 

Sources: wikipedia.org, inquirer.net, malacanang.gov.ph, manilatimes.net, ninoyaquino.ph


Main photo via Shutterstock

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