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Eight things in your property listing that might scare off buyers | MyProperty.ph
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Eight things in your property listing that might scare off buyers

by Jillian CariolaPublished: September 27, 2017Updated: September 29, 2017

Were you demonically possessed when you created your listing? There are ways to tell

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines

Horror novels and screenplays are written to scare aficionados of the spine-tingling genre, but if the same method of writing is applied somewhere else, public consumption may not be as enthusiastic. In real estate, for instance, your goal is to attract customers, not repel them, so you need to be careful about how you present the home, and it usually starts with the listing. In the spirit of Halloween, let’s take a look at some of the elements in your property’s advertisement that might spook potential buyers into running in the other direction.

Typographical errors

In Stephen King’s The Shining, remember how Jack typed “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” over and over and how freaked out his wife had been when she saw it? Would it have made the same impact had he mistakenly typed “plag” instead of “play”? Probably not. Listings riddled with grammatical errors, misspellings, and misplaced punctuation can distract from an otherwise impressive property. Proofread your work before posting it, or better yet, ask other people to give it a once-over so they can point out any mistakes you may have missed.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines witch casting spell
"Hocus, focus... wait, that's not right." Photo via Depositphotos

Short/no description

Have you ever encountered a listing with so few words in the description, it made you think “Wow, even Jason Voorhees had more to say than this.” Most real estate platforms require sellers to provide details like location, floor area, and number of rooms, but if they also provide space for your description of the property, why not use it? Talk about the special features of the home, how many minutes or kilometers the nearest hospital or mall is, or what amenities the subdivision offers its homeowners. Be careful of your wording but be honest; you don’t want to get accused of providing misleading information.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines Woman with tape over mouth
Unless someone's keeping you from speaking up, describe your property in words. Photo via Depositphotos

No photo

If you’ve seen the movie Shutter, you’d know that it is about a couple whose new marriage gets strained by the husband’s mysterious past. How does the wife find out? With photos that reveal what really happened. Visuals are important, and no matter how many flowery words you inject into your home’s description, only photos can tell the buyer what the home looks like on the surface. Not posting a photo with your listing gives off the impression that there’s something about the property you don’t want anyone to see. But don’t upload just any image you take; it’s also important to take good photos to ensure that you’re doing the property justice.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines no image available
Is the house magically invisible? Photo via Depositphotos

“As is”

Inheriting a home sounds like a dream, right? But not until you find out that you’re also inheriting the property’s myriad of maintenance problems or, as in the case of Thirteen Ghosts, its terrifying secret. In some cases of houses for sale, the label “as is” means “whatever issues the house has, they’re your problem now.” It’s similar to phrases like “needs improvement,” and “fixer-upper,” both of which are a seller’s attempt at optimism (“the possibilities are endless!”) but only raise suspicion about the extent of the property’s repair needs.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines damaged house interior
It's going to take more than an exorcism to fix this. Photo via Depositphotos

“See to appreciate”

At the beginning of the movie Urban Legend, a gas station attendant tries to warn a woman that someone is hiding in her backseat, but his appearance and demeanor scare her off instead, leading to her early demise. Why bring this up? As kids, we are taught not to judge a book by its cover, but in real estate, curb appeal still matters. Even if your property looks incredible on the inside, if the listing bears the words “see to appreciate,” that sends the signal that something is wrong on the outside: either the exterior of the property needs a lot of work, or the home is in an inconvenient location.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines house in forest
Unless you're a die-hard horror fan, it's pretty hard to appreciate a home that looks like this. Photo via Depositphotos

“Near tricycle terminal/bus routes”

The old “isolated house” trope in movies like Cabin in the Woods is one that’s been used in scary movies multiple times because the idea of being attacked and having no one to turn to for help adds to the fear factor. Having said that, you can’t knock it for having a quiet atmosphere, something you probably won’t get from a home that’s described as being “very close to public transportation.” The convenience is a plus, but the more analytical house buyer will not gloss over the fact that it also means the property is near the highway, which translates to a lot of noise coming from blaring horns and amped-up mufflers.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines man wide awake
Noise pollution: torture in the form of sleep deprivation. Photo via Depositphotos

“Motivated seller”

When you say something like “the last owners stayed barely a month, and they really want to sell right away,” what the buyer is probably thinking is, “are they selling me the Amityville Horror home?” You might just be trying to imply urgency by using phrases like “motivated seller” or “fast sale,” but unless you are actually on a deadline, doing so is going to create the impression that the property has a lot of issues so the seller is literally just trying to get rid of it. Could it be haunted? Or, more realistically, does it need a lot of repairs? Also, creating unnecessary pressure shuts out potential buyers who need more time to decide. No one wants to be pressured into buying a home until they are absolutely sure, so they will probably look elsewhere, no matter how nice your home looks or how great the deal sounds.

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines zombies chasing man
If it feels more like a pursuit than an offer, buyers will run away. Photo via Depositphotos

“Starter home”

In the movie Tusk, a traveler responds to a handbill describing—quite pleasantly, to say the least—exactly what he was looking for at that moment: a room for the night and stories he could later narrate in his podcast. What he got, though, was a Kafkaesque nightmare with an equally disturbing end. Not that the guy’s grim fate in the movie might actually happen, but it does show how people sometimes use words to make something sound better than it actually is. The expression “starter home” may seem positive, like you’re helping two young adults start their new life together, but most people know that this is code for “tiny.” These days, affordable family homes are already on the small side, so what more a home for two? Similar-sounding terms to avoid are “perfect for newlyweds,” and “ideal for couples.”

Eight things to avoid when creating a real estate property listing MyProperty Philippines woman inside box
Yes, claustrophobia is a real fear. Photo via Depositphotos

 

Main photo via Depositphotos

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